Science in a Jar
  • NASA: provides troves of data about the moon that couldn't be made up
  • NASA: provides images of it used by technologies that were just being made at the time
  • NASA: provided thousands of jobs to citizens in the quest to learn about the moon
  • NASA: uses the very real data acquired from its moon missions to further understand moon formations and satellites like it
  • NASA: dealt with grueling tests, trials and tribulations to get people on the moon
  • person:
  • some conspiracy site you got linked off a youtube vid about aliens: what if he nasa not went not moon?
  • person: you have a point, this could have all been staged

"Nothing would have changed the reality that the person you were in love with had stopped loving you somewhere along the line, whether it was in the middle of a conversation or while driving under a bridge or when they made eye contact with someone new and wonderful. It doesn’t matter. Stop wasting your time on them. You don’t need to stop your story just because they are no longer a main character. Do not take back what has already poisoned you. Instead start healing and start healing soon."

Raquel, How to stop loving someone who does not love you (via larmoyante)

ah thank you very much for liking this quote of mine!! :)

asapscience:

Excellent advice from (arguably) the coolest physicist to have ever lived, Richard Feynman: you don’t have to be a genius to want to study science, you just have to work hard!
Edit: just realized the initial quote reads: “ordinary” rather than “normal” — our apologies for the screw up! 
Photo via Vice, quote via whats-out-there

asapscience:

Excellent advice from (arguably) the coolest physicist to have ever lived, Richard Feynman: you don’t have to be a genius to want to study science, you just have to work hard!

Edit: just realized the initial quote reads: “ordinary” rather than “normal” — our apologies for the screw up! 

Photo via Vice, quote via whats-out-there

mucholderthen:

Mutated, drug-resistant bacteria lurk in the peaceful British countryside
Sewage-treatment plants described as giant ‘mixing vessels’
after scientists discover mutated microbes in British river

Exclusive to The Independent, 19 July 2014 (by Steve Connor)

Superbugs resistant to some of the most powerful antibiotics in the medical arsenal have been found for the first time in a British river – with scientists pinpointing a local sewage-treatment plant as the most likely source.

Scientists discovered the drug-resistant bacteria in sediment samples taken downstream of the sewerage plant on the River Sowe near Coventry. The microbes contained mutated genes that confer resistance to the latest generation of antibiotics.

The researchers believe the discovery shows how antibiotic resistance has become widespread in the environment, with sewage-treatment plants now acting as giant “mixing vessels” where antibiotic resistance can spread between different microbes.

A study found that a wide range of microbes living in the river had acquired a genetic mutation that is known to provide resistance to third-generation cephalosporins, a class of antibiotics used widely to treat meningitis, blood infections and other hospital-acquired infections.

Read more …

Copyright by The Independent, all rights reserved.

This is both incredible and incredibly terrifying

"In the day time the street was dusty, but at night the dew settled the dust and the old man liked to sit late because he was deaf and now at night it was quiet and he felt the difference."

Ernest Hemingway: A Clean, Well-Lighted Place
nicethingsinuglyhandwriting:

I just don’t think I’ll ever get over you // Colin Hay.

nicethingsinuglyhandwriting:

I just don’t think I’ll ever get over you // Colin Hay.

skunkbear:

The recent release of “Dawn of the Planet of the Apes" reminded me of one of my favorite ape vs. man films – this 1932 video that shows a baby chimpanzee and a baby human undergoing the same basic psychological tests.

Its gets weirder – the human baby (Donald) and the chimpanzee baby (Gua) were both raised as humans by their biological/adopted father Winthrop Niles Kellogg.  Kellogg was a comparative psychologist fascinated by the interplay between nature and nurture, and he devised a fascinating (and questionably ethical) experiment to study it:

Suppose an anthropoid were taken into a typical human family at the day of birth and reared as a child. Suppose he were fed upon a bottle, clothed, washed, bathed, fondled, and given a characteristically human environment; that he were spoken to like the human infant from the moment of parturition; that he had an adopted human mother and an adopted human father.

First, Kellogg had to convince his pregnant wife he wasn’t crazy:

 …the enthusiasm of one of us met with so much resistance from the other that it appeared likely we could never come to an agreement upon whether or not we should even attempt such an undertaking.

She apparently gave in, because Donald and Gua were raised, for nine months, as brother and sister. Much like Caesar in the “Planet of the Apes” movies, Gua developed faster than her “brother,” and often outperformed him in tasks. But she soon hit a cognitive wall, and the experiment came to an end. (Probably for the best, as Donald had begun to speak chimpanzee.)

You can read more about Kellogg’s experiment, its legacy, and public reaction to it here.

alxndrasplace:

(HubbleSite) The dwarf galaxy NGC 4214 is ablaze with young stars and gas clouds. Located around 10 million light-years away in the constellation of Canes Venatici (The Hunting Dogs), the galaxy’s close proximity, combined with the wide variety of evolutionary stages among the stars, make it an ideal laboratory to research the triggers of star formation and evolution. This color image was taken using the Hubble Space Telescope’s Wide Field Camera 3 in December 2009.

alxndrasplace:

(HubbleSite) The dwarf galaxy NGC 4214 is ablaze with young stars and gas clouds. Located around 10 million light-years away in the constellation of Canes Venatici (The Hunting Dogs), the galaxy’s close proximity, combined with the wide variety of evolutionary stages among the stars, make it an ideal laboratory to research the triggers of star formation and evolution. This color image was taken using the Hubble Space Telescope’s Wide Field Camera 3 in December 2009.

explainers-nysci:


Micro Medicine
For years, we have been wasting time by taking medicine, vitamins, and various other drugs the hard way. First we uncap the childproof bottle and shake out way more capsules than necessary into the palm of our hands. Then, we select the one or two pills we’ll be taking, pour a glass of water, place it at the very back of our tongues, and swallow a huge gulp of water. Lots of people go through this process day after day, but what if it didn’t have to be that way? 
MicroCHIPS is a company that has created an electronic drug delivery system that is small enough to fit on your fingertip. The 20mm x 7mm microchip is implanted under the skin of your stomach, your upper arm, or your rear-end! Tiny banks in the chip store the drug to be delivered. An internal battery sends an electric current through the device. A seal made of platinum and titanium then temporarily melts and allows the drug to be released each day. 
The microchip can release the drug every day for up to 16 years, but also allows the user to turn off the device when necessary. This may not be a wise choice when dealing with medicines that are prescribed for everyday use, like insulin for diabetes, but it is a nice option when dispensing birth control. 
Current uses for the device involve levonorgestrel, a hormone usually used in contraceptives. With MircroCHIPS’ invention, users no longer have to remember to take a pill, but when they are ready to conceive, a remote control can be used to switch the chip off. But don’t worry, the communication between the remote and the implant has to occur at skin contact, so no one can reprogram your implant from across the room. 
So, if you had access to MicroCHIPS’ device, what would you fill it with?

explainers-nysci:

Micro Medicine

For years, we have been wasting time by taking medicine, vitamins, and various other drugs the hard way. First we uncap the childproof bottle and shake out way more capsules than necessary into the palm of our hands. Then, we select the one or two pills we’ll be taking, pour a glass of water, place it at the very back of our tongues, and swallow a huge gulp of water. Lots of people go through this process day after day, but what if it didn’t have to be that way?

MicroCHIPS is a company that has created an electronic drug delivery system that is small enough to fit on your fingertip. The 20mm x 7mm microchip is implanted under the skin of your stomach, your upper arm, or your rear-end! Tiny banks in the chip store the drug to be delivered. An internal battery sends an electric current through the device. A seal made of platinum and titanium then temporarily melts and allows the drug to be released each day.

The microchip can release the drug every day for up to 16 years, but also allows the user to turn off the device when necessary. This may not be a wise choice when dealing with medicines that are prescribed for everyday use, like insulin for diabetes, but it is a nice option when dispensing birth control.

Current uses for the device involve levonorgestrel, a hormone usually used in contraceptives. With MircroCHIPS’ invention, users no longer have to remember to take a pill, but when they are ready to conceive, a remote control can be used to switch the chip off. But don’t worry, the communication between the remote and the implant has to occur at skin contact, so no one can reprogram your implant from across the room.

So, if you had access to MicroCHIPS’ device, what would you fill it with?

"Go all the way with it. Do not back off. For once, go all the goddamn way with what matters."

Ernest Hemingway (via acrylicalchemy)